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A question regarding the order you follow in the PWN guide for the Official SAT Tests…

Hello Mike,
I have a question regarding the order you follow in the PWN guide for the Official SAT Tests. Do you follow the order of the College Board website? I have a blue book The Official SAT Study Guide 2020 edition, with eight SAT tests. The order of the tests does not follow the same order as the one listed in the College Board website, and does not include tests 2 and 4 listed there. Thank you. Regards,
Elizabeth

f(x) = √x and g(x) = 3x – b…

f(x) = √x
g(x) = 3x – b

If the graph of y = f(g(x)) passes through (6, 5) in the standard (x, y) coordinate plane, what is the value of b?

In a certain class of 70 students, 4/7 of the students are boys, and the ratio of students 10 years or older to students less than 10 years is 2:3. If 2/3 of the girls are less than 10 years old, how many boys are 10 years old or older?

OK, so you have 40 boys and 30 girls. That’s easy enough to calculate because you’re given a part:whole ratio (boys to total students) and you already know the total number of students is 70. Be careful about the second ratio, though, because it’s a part:part ratio! If the ratio of older to younger is (more…)

Students in a Science lab are working in groups to build both a small and a large electrical circuit…

Students in a Science lab are working in groups to build both a small and a large electrical circuit. A large circuit uses 4 resistors and 2 capacitors, and a small circuit uses 3 resistors and 1 capacitor. There are 100 resistors and 70 capacitors available, and each group must have enough resistors and capacitors to make one large and one small circuit. What is the maximum number of groups that could work on this lab project?

4, 7, 3, 4,….In the sequence above, the first term is 4, the second term is 7, and each term after the second term is the nonnegative difference…

4, 7, 3, 4,….
In the sequence above, the first term is 4, the second term is 7, and each term after the second term is the nonnegative difference between the previous two terms. If the nth term is the first term of the sequence that is equal to zero, what is the value of n?

Okay I know this number can be solved through first principles(finding each number in the sequence manually) but I can’t help but wonder if there’s a certain algebraic formula or method one can utilize to solve it.

On page 28, question 8, when I looked at the solutions, the number 1 was plugged in to solve the problem…

On page 28, question 8, when I looked at the solutions, the number 1 was plugged in to solve the problem. However, on the beginning of the book the author said to never plug 0 and 1…Anyhow, my question is, if never plugging 1 is suggested, how did you know that plugging 1 in would work in your favor for the question(btw I got it right but I didn’t plug 1 in, I thought of other numbers but it did take me longer to figure out the numbers that’d add up to 11)